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Why Babies Smile

July 2nd, 2015 | By: Nancy Ripton
Is your baby happy to see you, or does she just have gas? Find out what your baby's smile really means.
Why Babies Smile

It’s hard not to feel overjoyed when your baby gazes adoringly into your eyes and flashes a brief, but unmistakable smile. But is she really trying to communicate her joy at seeing you, or does she simply have gas?

Can Defiancy Lead to Early Aging?

June 18th, 2015 | By: Nancy Ripton
Defiant Preschoolers May Be at Risk of Increased Cellular Aging
Can Defiancy Lead to Early Aging?

No one wants to deal with a defiant preschooler. However if your child acts out often it may a sign that they are at risk of increased cellular aging.

Helping Your Toddler Make Friends

March 20th, 2015 | By: Sydney Loney
How to teach your toddler to forge healthy first friendships
Helping Your Toddler Make Friends

Studies show that children with friends have a greater sense of well-being, higher self-esteem and fewer social problems than children without friends. Here’s how to help your child find healthy, fulfilling friendships.

Baby's Developmental Milestones

February 6th, 2015 | By: Nancy Ripton
From crawling to saying his first words, learning when to expect your baby's milestones can help you adjust to his changing needs.
Baby's Developmental Milestones

We all want our kids to have the brains of Einstein, the coordination of Michael Jordan and the grace of a prima ballerina, but just because your baby reaches a milestone ahead of schedule doesn't mean he's headed for greatness. (If he's a little slower getting there, that's usually no biggie either.) Tracking milestones can be helpful in gauging appropriate playtime, providing a safe environment and exposing potential problems. Here's how to monitor your baby's progress:

Tummy Time for Babies

February 2nd, 2015 | By: Nancy Ripton
Why it's important for your newborn to spend time on her tummy.
Tummy Time for Babies

Tummy time is important because it prevents flattening of the head and enhances motor development. “Tummy time teaches babies to push up on their arms,” says child development expert Lora Lesak. Motor development occurs from head to toe, so if a baby is slow to develop shoulder strength, delays will trickle down to rolling, sitting and crawling.