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Coping with Invasive In-laws

How to keep the peace and establish a strong bond between your child and his grandparents.

by: Armin Brott

In This Article
    

M

uch as you may not want to hear this, in the minds of your in-laws, their opinion does matter more than yours. They've done this all before and, when it comes to their grandchild, they consider themselves to be the best authority on everything from feeding and sleeping to discipline and toilet training. That's a tough mindset to change, but you can do it and keep the peace at the same time. Here's how to cope with interfering inlaws:

Establish your own roles as parents

The big kicker is that your partner has to be on board with you in order to present a united front. First of all, you need to have some serious discussions about what, exactly, your independent roles as parents are going to be. It's not uncommon for couples to have very different expectations when it comes to parenting.

So be very specific with each other about who'll be doing what. Who gets up for those 3 a.m. feedings? Who's responsible for the diapers–both changing and buying? When will you introduce solid foods and what will that first food be? Should your baby sleep in the same bed as you and your partner? Are you going to teach your baby sign language? A lot of couples avoid dealing with these issues because they're afraid they'll lead to conflict, but dealing with them now will make life easier for both of you in the long run.

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